ahomeforbirds:

Hans Memling - Hell (1485)

ahomeforbirds:

Hans Memling - Hell (1485)

funkchunk:

The Black Madonna

funkchunk:

The Black Madonna

flyingdoomkat:

k-k-k-krampus time

flyingdoomkat:

k-k-k-krampus time

devendras-mistress:

The story behind this picture is that a king was spiritually powerful enough to access Shiva, who granted him the power not to be killed.
The rules in this contract were that he couldn’t be killed by any man or beast, neither at day nor night, inside or outside his castle.
Fast-forward a few years, this king has become arrogant. He wishes to be prayed to instead of the gods, and one day he catches his goody two shoes kid praying to Lord Vishnu. When asked to stop chanting the Lord’s name, the kid says no and the king goes apeshit. The story has variations here, some say mad elephants were set loose to trample on the boy but they bowed to him, or he was thrown down a cliff and survived, or that he was thrown in a vat of boiling oil but still wasn’t harmed. 
The king gets upset, and asks where this “Vishnu” is. The boy says he’s everywhere, even in the pillar that the king is pointing at. The king either kicks or hammers down the pillar out of which THIS hunk of junk steps out. It takes the king in his lap and tears open his stomach, ending his ass. 
As per the contract it is exactly dusk, no weapons are used (talons don’t count! lol) and the killer is neither human nor a beast.
That kid is totally killing the rage vibe by trying to throw a garland around Narasigumha’s mane. 

devendras-mistress:

The story behind this picture is that a king was spiritually powerful enough to access Shiva, who granted him the power not to be killed.

The rules in this contract were that he couldn’t be killed by any man or beast, neither at day nor night, inside or outside his castle.

Fast-forward a few years, this king has become arrogant. He wishes to be prayed to instead of the gods, and one day he catches his goody two shoes kid praying to Lord Vishnu. When asked to stop chanting the Lord’s name, the kid says no and the king goes apeshit. The story has variations here, some say mad elephants were set loose to trample on the boy but they bowed to him, or he was thrown down a cliff and survived, or that he was thrown in a vat of boiling oil but still wasn’t harmed. 

The king gets upset, and asks where this “Vishnu” is. The boy says he’s everywhere, even in the pillar that the king is pointing at. The king either kicks or hammers down the pillar out of which THIS hunk of junk steps out. It takes the king in his lap and tears open his stomach, ending his ass. 

As per the contract it is exactly dusk, no weapons are used (talons don’t count! lol) and the killer is neither human nor a beast.

That kid is totally killing the rage vibe by trying to throw a garland around Narasigumha’s mane. 

smyrno:

In folklore traced back to medieval legend, a succubus (plural succubi) is a female demon or supernatural being appearing in dreams, who takes the form of a human woman in order to seduce men, usually through sexual intercourse. Religious traditions hold that repeated intercourse with a succubus may result in the deterioration of health or even death.
In modern fictional representations, a succubus may or may not appear in dreams and is often depicted as a highly attractive seductress or enchantress; whereas, in the past, succubi were generally depicted as frightening and demonic.
(art: Dejian Wu)

smyrno:

In folklore traced back to medieval legend, a succubus (plural succubi) is a female demon or supernatural being appearing in dreams, who takes the form of a human woman in order to seduce men, usually through sexual intercourse. Religious traditions hold that repeated intercourse with a succubus may result in the deterioration of health or even death.

In modern fictional representations, a succubus may or may not appear in dreams and is often depicted as a highly attractive seductress or enchantress; whereas, in the past, succubi were generally depicted as frightening and demonic.

(art: Dejian Wu)

gobletofdionysos:

Divine Comedy
Dante’s Inferno by William Bouguereau 1850

gobletofdionysos:

Divine Comedy

Dante’s Inferno by William Bouguereau 1850

A message from Anonymous


Hello, I`m just wondering if you are the only demonology blog on here?

Hm. perhaps, though some of my favourite blogs frequently post about demons.